Discovering ‘Egypt’. What is ‘MISR’ in Qur’an?


By Silver Lining

In Quran, the word ‘misr’ is not the country named ‘Egypt.’ As per my humble understanding, ‘misr’ is used in Quran as to ‘CHANGE particular position to good or bad’. Let’s ponder the use of ‘misr’ in verses of Qur’an.
1. ‘MISR’ as changing to good position from bad:
• Qur’an 12:99-100 (indicates MISR as changing to good/better position)
12:99 Then, when they entered upon Yusuf, he took his parents to him and he said, “Enter MISR, God willing, in security.” 12:100 He RAISED HIS PARENTS ON THE THRONE, and …………”
• Qur’an 12: 20-21 (indicates MISR as changing to good/better position)
“(12:20) And they (wayfarers) sold him (Yusuf) for a paltry price, for a few silver-coins, and they had not much interest in him. (12:21) And the one who bought him of/from ‘MISR’ said to his wife, .Make his stay graceful. He may be useful for us……..”
• Qur’an 10:87 “And We revealed to Musa and his brother: Have houses for your people in MISR, and make your houses worship oriented, and establish Salah, and give good tidings to the believers.”
Please note: good tidings to the dwellers of HOUSE which is in MISR. Thus, House in MISR changes their position into good.
2. ‘MISR’ as changing to a worse position from good:
• Qur’an 43:51-54: Here Firaun was ‘Changing’ the belief of his community towards Firaun separating them from Musa. “Am I not the ‘Mulku’ (authority) of ‘Misr’ (better Change)?” Qur’an 43:51 please note: this is a false claim from Firaun.
• Qur’an 2:61 (MISR indicates changing to worse position)
“And when you said, “O Musa! We can never endure one (kind of) food. So pray to your Lord to bring forth for us out of what the earth grows, its herbs, its cucumbers, its garlic, its lentils, and its onions.” He said, “Would you exchange that which is better for that which is inferior? Go down to ‘MISR’ and indeed you will have what you have asked for.” And humiliation and misery were struck upon them and they drew on themselves the wrath of Allah…..”
Concluding remark: the word ‘MISR’ in Quran means ‘CHANGE particular position to good or bad’. If any honourable reader disagree with this remark, then please mention what do you think is ‘misr’ and provide your evidence in support of your view. We all are learner.
Traditional translations translated ‘misr’ as ‘Egypt’ probably following the false dogma of biblical theory. We know ‘Allahus Samad” and Allah commanded us to depend on HIM only. There is no verse to which says ‘Misr’ in Quran indicates a golf country named ‘Egypt’. My understanding may be wrong, however I’m always ready to change if this may prove to be incorrect.

If ‘Misr’ is a name of place then there is several contradiction:
Foraun is the authority of Egypt who misguides people (43:51-54) but contrary to this fact Allah commanded Musa to build House (10:87) of worship in Egypt!
Again, Musa commanded his com
munity to go down Egypt (2:61) to get inferior foods! But Yusuf 12:100 takes his parents to Egypt to raise on the throne!
Plenty of ODDS arises if ‘MISR’ would be name of a place called ‘Egypt.’ Egypt is bad because of Firaun and inferior food but good for worship and living!!!- that’s impossible to be true.

Advertisements

About Farouk A. Peru
I am a human being in the world, blogging my existence. My thought systems may be found in my website: www.farouk.name

3 Responses to Discovering ‘Egypt’. What is ‘MISR’ in Qur’an?

  1. What is the word “Egypt” that you are seeing in the Quran.

    If Misr means Mizriam, as there was no such thing as Egypt before the term Egypt was associated with the land following the Hebrew concept of Oppression.

    What is the false dogma that you see in the bible in reference to the title Egypt or Mizriam?

    Teddy Galloway 858-869-9807 http://www.Teddy3inDC.com

    “The highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them” – JFK

    On Tue, May 5, 2015 at 2:49 PM, Quranist Voices – Musings on Being Quranist

  2. I’m sure you know and saw this information, but I wanted to present it to you.

    http://www.islamic-awareness.org/Quran/Contrad/External/misr.html

    Teddy Galloway 858-869-9807 http://www.Teddy3inDC.com

    “The highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them” – JFK

    On Tue, May 5, 2015 at 2:56 PM, Arayah Y’Israel wrote:

    > What is the word “Egypt” that you are seeing in the Quran. > > If Misr means Mizriam, as there was no such thing as Egypt before the term > Egypt was associated with the land following the Hebrew concept of > Oppression. > > What is the false dogma that you see in the bible in reference to the > title Egypt or Mizriam? > > Teddy Galloway > 858-869-9807 > http://www.Teddy3inDC.com > > “The highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them” – > JFK > > > On Tue, May 5, 2015 at 2:49 PM, Quranist Voices – Musings on Being

  3. I truthfully don’t understand the conclusion of your writing. How is it a contraction to claim that people can go get food in that land, but that the food, although more desirable, is inferior in nourishment? How does it being a place good for worship and living, if the whole of earth was made for worship and living, have anything to do with your conclusion?

    What do we gain by thinking that the word “Misr” means to “change” – albeit for the better – rather than the land? What is the practical use? Is the purpose to disassociate a land with the story and instead to somehow present a allegorical story?

    To me, presentation #1 and #2 are contradictory. Who determines whether “Misr” is a good or bad change? Do we leave that to our own devices?

    You asked the reader to present why they disagree with your analysis but you didn’t even offer an antidote of why your presentation is more fitting than the traditional. In this case, taking Misr as a place, which is supported historically and culturally and geographically, serves to add context to a story and presents the reader with a real location to seek archaeological answers from. As a location the title “Misr” takes away all ambiguity away from the story, thus keeps the promise of a book fully detailed.

    We are suppose to question everything, of course, but we should really look at our motivations and what benefits it has. We should be able to show people that our words have meaning through adjustment of actions and awareness of truth. Evidence is not Proof.

    Is the thing we are inclined to do based off of a dislike for a story or a thought/philosophy based on our own inclinations? What and why are we motivated to discuss it? Are we blinded by our questions, so we do no longer seek a reason for our questioning?

    The more logical question would be: Was Faroun truly the “King” of all the land, or just something like a governor of sorts in a specific district?

    For the record:

    If all of the food that my community needs was given to them, and they were growing in health and wellness, but then some of them decided that they wanted (for instance) Pork, I would tell them “Go down to ‘That land over there that has it’ and indeed you will have what you have asked for”. I would also say “Would you exchange that which is better for that which is inferior?”, as I am holding the food that I have a superior to their pork and other foods of choice.

    Because of this, it seem quite obvious that this is a location. It seems that in order to question Allah that they have already descended in wisdom, not understanding the blessing that they were given in the first place, thus they have had no need to “change” as the change had already taken place.

    ——-

    I find your explanation lacking logic, purpose, reason, and wisdom. It feels as though you are trying to make an allegory out of solid statement. It also flies in the face of history, archaeology, and other studies that suggest the name. The name of the land was not Egypt until some people started calling it that. As studies show, it was called Miriam because that was the name of the original settlers, who were progeny of Noah and Ham. You don’t have to accept that narrative, or the science, or the explanation above, but the presentation presented doesn’t add to clarity of the Quran.

    Literally everything you quoted from the Quran, even in your own translation suggest a physical location, even if you don’t want it to.

    Peace and blessings.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: