The Promise of the Ibada Study


Whenever I see in the Concordance of the Quran an entry more than a page long, I get scared off. Hence my extreme feet-dragging about concepts like rabb, ilm and ayah…and of course ibadah. However, a few days ago I looked at OpenBurhan for a verse with the word ‘a3budoo’ and realised that the study of ibadah yields some very interesting results. Check this out:

يَا أَيُّهَا الَّذِينَ آمَنُوا كُلُوا مِنْ طَيِّبَاتِ مَا رَزَقْنَاكُمْ وَاشْكُرُوا لِلَّهِ إِنْ كُنْتُمْ إِيَّاهُ تَعْبُدُونَ

O you who believe, eat from the good things we provided for you, and be thankful to GOD, if you do worship Him alone (2/172)
iyyahu ta3bduoon (if you worship him alone) shows that a level of tawheed which is strange for a command about consumption! Ibada is definitely something more than I previously thought…

The Quran and the Counter Movement


It’s all well and good conducting a deep research into the Quran. It keeps our faith and conceptual framework strong. We are able to see how the Quran continues to unveil deeper and deeper layers of truth to us. I for one am continually amazed by this. However, this is not why we’re here on earth. As the Quran itself says, we are here to serve (51/56). We all serve something. The best of course is to serve Allah.

What do I mean by the counter-movement? I mean the movement which counters the enslaving nature of current world politics. How does the Quran play a role in this? The Quran opposes oppression and slavery. It wants everyone to be masters of their own domain, not to be slaves of others. Indeed that was the nabi’s statement when he says ‘kunoo rabbaniyeen’ (3/79)

How does the Quran stand in this counter movement though?

will continue later..

The Concept of God in the Quran (intro)


People have endlessly questioned this. I do not mean atheists, historians, writers or philosophers, but people I knew. Friends, “family”, random debaters… and so on.

One of the most interesting beliefs I shared with few of them was that atheists (or those who deny the existence of a higher source or its need for our worship, in some way or the other) were more believers than religious or even spiritual individuals.

As they had no god or gods to follow, no laws to rule by (laws that do not always meet with logic), and no rituals beside personal ones, some of them decided to adopt a moral code. They spread less “mischief” than believers, and they commit less “sin” than any religious person. Why?

Well, religious individuals forbid all sorts of things – especially every-day requirements. There is no way to follow all these laws without a major heartbreaking sacrifice: the sacrifice of oneself. Everything becomes a sin. Small issues become major sins. The wars, the slavery, the patriarchy system. All these are things that can easily be justified in the name of God. People’s love for Allah can be used. It’s what my Mushu calls “Emotional Blackmail”.

True it is, love and devotion are powerful tools, especially if a person decides to make that sacrifice after all. Any religious leader can blackmail the human conscience and insist upon some malady or the other in service to the Heavens.

Most atheists I met or spoke to were ethical. They were clean, and I mean morally clean. They hold no grudge for what religious people may irrationally hate, such as homosexuality. They are willing to debate at any time. They are willing to make records and discoveries. I am quite certain a great number of them would still be “religious” if the world’s religions made sense and did not impose harsh expectations for each “religious” individual.

Even among fellow Quranists, I find quite a few biased rules. Perhaps they are biased in my point of view only, for they are godly ideas to others.

“Religio-logically” speaking, religion “is equal to” morals. Quite a dangerous formula! Many religious people would assume that once someone becomes godless, he loses all morals; the “who is godless is evil”. It’s difficult to observe this on real ground! All those godless people (for any person may be an atheist according to some religion or the other) live in development, although the believe in evolution, and live in happiness, although they may favour Jesus, Achamán, Shiva or nothing. It’s a fact that those who lived most happily or “moved on” where people least concerned about religion, but more concerned about practical life.

 This is why I am eager to write on the subject. I want to discover how my Maker describes Himself, and how He orders us to behold Him using the Quran. I wish to know if “dhikr” is to pay God lip-service, or whether it is to bring Him out into life (which would depend on the definition of god according to my view point of the Quran). In other words, it’s time to put Quran in the light of nourishing life instead of a theory residing in books. It’s important for me to know if my image of God will judge all people by how they believed, or who they believed in instead, or even when and where this judgment will take place.

I want to say “peace” instead of “goodbye” and actually mean it!